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Valentine's Day can mean a romantic meal with a special someone, but it can also be a family affair. After all, Valentine's Day doesn't need to be strictly for romance; share the love with your whole family by finding family-friendly Valentine's Day activities.

If you're searching for something to do on Valentine's Day with the whole family, you can try revisiting some of the classics, but with a twist. You can also make some new traditions of your own.

Whatever you end up doing, don't feel confined by the staples of the holiday. Valentine's Day can celebrate all types of love, including paternal, so figure out what's right for you and your family. Here are six ideas to help get you started.

In the latest episode of ExtremeTerrain’s Throttle Out YouTube video series, host Merideth Evasew wrenches on a brand-new Jeep Wrangler JLU Rubicon, adding some functional and stylish Jeep parts from Deegan 38 and Teraflex.

Adding Jeep armor, lighting, recovery gear, and a big set of wheels & tires, Merideth guides you through her build process, explaining special features and benefits as well as her reasons for the parts she selected. After an overview of the build and all its components, Merideth takes the JL Rubicon for its maiden voyage to further demonstrate the road friendliness of the Teraflex suspension and 37” mud-terrain tires.

We all know that exercise is important. But many people struggle to keep a routine going. Sports offer an excellent option for people who don't want to feel like exercise is a drag. Just how important are sports in contributing to a healthy lifestyle both in childhood and adulthood? Read on to find out why playing a sport throughout your life can be so beneficial.

The new year is thought of as a fresh start -- and if citizens of the world fail to take action to protect the planet, we might not have many fresh starts (or years ahead of us) left. That's why many homeowners are making a pledge to be more energy efficient and eco-friendly overall in 2020. But if you don't want to take on massive renovations or even sacrifice your relative comfort, can you still be sustainable?

The answer is a resounding "yes." By implementing some simple changes, you can make your home more environmentally sound, reduce your carbon footprint, and maybe even save some money in the coming year. Here are a few ways to go about it.

Add Some Green

If you want to go green, you might want to add green. That might mean spending some green up front, as well, but most people will tell you that it'll pay off in the end. Not only can landscaping add as much as 14% to your home's resale value, but it can potentially do wonders for your surrounding community. In fact, one tree can remove 26 pounds of carbon dioxide from the air each year, equalling 11,000 miles of car emissions! Although it may mean a bit more yard work for you to take care of, planting some trees can improve air quality. And if you're strategic about where you place your trees, you can provide some shade that will keep your home cooler and reduce how hard your HVAC system will need to work. Planting a vegetable garden can allow you to save money on groceries, as well, while focusing on native plants can support local wildlife (like our endangered and oh-so-important bees and other pollinators). Ultimately, a more self-sustaining life will translate to one with greater energy efficiency. This is also a great option for the almost 43 million renters in the United States who can't modify their homes to their liking.

Seal the Escape Routes

This section may sound extreme, but we're not talking about barring your windows and doors completely shut. Your home's doors and windows need to stay accessible to you, of course, but they need to keep air from being able to travel in and out. If there are gaps, you'll end up wasting energy. In fact, 30% of a home's heating energy is lost through its windows. That means you're paying extra for your HVAC system to work overtime. And since a good portion of your home is probably made up of windows, you'll have a bit of work to do to ensure your home stays comfortable and your bills stay low. Conduct an assessment of where your home seems drafty and seal or caulk any areas where air can escape. You may also want to call in a professional to take a look at your home's insulation, as air can easily escape through the attic, roof, or crawl spaces. These small adjustments can ensure the warm or cool air stays inside and the extreme weather stays out. Subsequently, you'll feel a lot better in your home and won't be stuck with unnecessary expenses each month. As a bonus, your heating and cooling system can work more efficiently and will likely last a lot longer.

Ponder Your Power and Appliances

Speaking of your heating and cooling system, it's time to consider your appliances -- and what's powering them. Although many American homes still rely on conventional utilities to supply electricity, solar panels are becoming more popular with each passing year. It's easy to see why, as cost reductions have made them far more accessible to the masses. If PV panels were installed on just 0.6% of the nation's total land area, these panels could supply enough energy to power the entire country. If you've been considering swapping out your utility company for solar panel installation, the new year might be a good time to finally take the plunge. Eventually, you'll be able to provide all the power you need and you'll end up saving money. This is essential given that 30% of Americans have bad credit. And because you'll probably be a bit more aware of the power you use, you'll likely end up being a bit more conservative with your usage.

Of course, if you're going to completely change your power supply, you might want to rethink your major appliances, too. Homes that are a bit older may come equipped with appliances, but these appliances may not meet current energy efficiency standards. This means you'll end up requiring (and wasting) more energy to use them. Some statistics show that a refrigerator that's a decade old can use twice the energy that a new model does! If you haven't yet switched to Energy Star models, there's no time like the present. You may even be able to take advantage of seasonal deals to save a bit of money -- though you'll end up lowering your energy bills as a result anyway.

Setting -- and keeping -- New Year's resolutions may not seem easy, but it's simpler than you think to make your home more energy efficient in 2020. By opting for eco-friendly practices, you can reduce your adverse impact on the world and reduce costs at the same time.

Monday, November 11 2019 07:49

What Should You Do If Your Car Gets Damaged?

Unfortunately, most car owners will have to deal with some degree of damage to their car at some point in their life. The average number of car accidents in the U.S. every year is a whopping six million. When it does happen, it can be hard to know exactly what steps you should take. Should you go through your auto insurance? Should you try to fix the damage yourself? Here are a few tips you can use if you ever find yourself with damage to your car.

Most Americans tend to rely on personal vehicles, rather than public transportation, to get from point A to point B. With nearly 6 million cars sold each year in the United States, it's no surprise that the majority of teens will obtain their driver's licenses as soon as possible. More often than not, U.S. adults wouldn't even consider forgoing vehicle ownership.

So it can be particularly devastating when you head out to leave for work, school, or a social engagement and discover that your car isn't where you left it. It's not that you've forgotten where you parked, either. Unfortunately, your car's been stolen.

It might be your worst nightmare, particularly if you keep valuables or irreplaceable items in your car's interior. While up to 20% of all insurance claims are related to water damage of some kind, vehicle theft is sometimes a problem that cannot be fixed. Worse yet, a purloined vehicle might be more common than you think -- especially if you live in certain areas. Last year, there were an estimated 748,841 vehicle thefts throughout the United States.

The metro area with the most stolen vehicles in 2018 was Albuquerque, with a theft rate of 780.2 vehicles per 100,000 residents. Rounding out the top five cities with the highest vehicle rates were Anchorage, Alaska; Bakersfield, California; Pueblo, Colorado; and Modesto, California. By far, California had the greatest number of vehicle theft-ridden cities, with 15 metro areas within the top 40 list compiled by the National Insurance Crime Bureau. Nearly all of the metro areas listed are located in the southern or western portions of the United States -- and, not surprisingly, most areas listed also have higher rates of other property crimes.

Although the average vehicle will have three owners in its lifetime, most of us don't expect to give up ownership unwillingly. And while the Dodge Charger HEMI, Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, Infiniti Q50 and QX80, and GMC Sierra 1500 top the list of most frequently stolen vehicles in the nation, the reality is that any car can be taken without your consent or knowledge. Of course, parking in well-lit areas, installing alarm systems and vehicle tracking devices, and locking your steering wheel can keep your car from being stolen in the first place. But failing that, there are a few steps you should always take.

First, you'll want to call the police and file a report. You'll need this stolen vehicle report in order to file any kind of insurance claim. It's best to provide law enforcement with as much information as possible, including the car's make and model, year, color, VIN and license plate number, any identifying characteristics, and GPS information, if applicable. You'll then want to contact your car insurance company. If you have a comprehensive car insurance policy, you'll be covered -- but even if you don't, you'll still need to let your insurer know your vehicle was stolen. That way, you'll be protected if property is damaged or someone becomes injured after your car has been taken. Make sure that all details are consistent between this insurance claim and your police report, as your insurer will likely launch an investigation to make sure everything lines up before paying out for a stolen vehicle. And if your car is leased or you have some sort of financing set up, you'll also need to notify the company; in most cases, the insurer will pay the lender so that you won't still be responsible for making payments on your stolen vehicle.

If you have any valuables in your car, you might want to file separate claims for these items. The three most-valuable commodities shipped in the U.S. include machinery, electronics, and other vehicles. While you're probably not shipping warehouse materials, your laptop, GPS, and other electronic devices might be covered by insurance.

Although you have some control over where you park (and where you live), you may not always be able to stop vehicle theft despite your best efforts. To minimize loss, make it a habit to keep no valuable items in your car, purchase comprehensive car insurance, and invest in security features that could drive thieves away. And if your vehicle is stolen, make sure to follow the steps outlined above to make the process go as smoothly as possible. Although these events can feel violating, thinking ahead and being prepared can make them a bit less devastating.

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