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Poop Talk

Comedy Dynamics & Party of 7 Entertinment's new docu-comedy Poop Talk is an open and honest look at a taboo topic in today’s society. It's an inside look at all things poop — from uncensored, embarrassing moments to scientific explanations recounted by 50 experts and comedians including Kumail Nanjiani, Nicole Byer, Adam Carolla, Rob Corddry, Nikki Glaser, Pete Holmes, Eric Stonestreet, Randy and Jason Sklar, Nick Swardson, Dr. Drew Pinsky and many others. To celebrate its release in select theaters, VOD and Digital HD, as the second part of a two-part interview (read part one hereThe Rock Father™ invited The Sklar Brothers (executive producers of the film, in addition to cast and parents) to share some thoughts on some new offerings from one of 2018's hottest trends in play - poop toys. It's a rapid-fire look at some of the crappiest playthings that kids will want this year, and we mean that as a compliment.

Every time I think that the micro-collectibles bubble is about to burst, something comes along that reinforces the fact that there's no sign of that happening. In fact, the market is evolving and kids can't get enough of these small little toys. Evolution brings us to the launch of Cake Pop Cuties, a new line from Basic Fun that checks the boxes on several current trends, combining the brightly-colored blind box appeal of toys like L.O.L. Surprise with the strange appeal of the slow-rise squishes movement into a tiny little package that's appropriately shaped like... a cake pop. Available soon at most major retailers (Amazon is taking pre-orders), Cake Pop Cuties is backed by a CGI-animated webseries and boasts over 36 different Cuties and Sweeties to collect in the first wave. Check out a preview below...

About a year ago, my girls got their first LITE-BRITE, which on the surface, I would've called "an upgrade" from the classic toy that Hasbro has been marketing in one form or another since 1967, if only because it borrowed styling from the iPad and called itself the "Lite-Brite LED Flatscreen." Thing is, while the nostalgia factor was certainly there, the version was clumsy, not as bright as it's old-school counterpart (remember the, big hot light bulb inside?), and the pegs were meant to fit within a flip-open storage tray at the bottom of the unit... one that didn't really fit all the included pegs, and to be stored in it's box, had to be folded flat - thus dumping the pegs. There were design issues (Amazon reviews have not been kind), but at it's core was the peg fun that generations have enjoyed, complete with black paper designs that were essentially use-once-then-toss, but as in the past - we kept them and made them work more than once. Fast-forward a year and the Lite-Brite has received a true upgrade, and what it appears to have taken is some fresh eyes on the project, these courtesy of Basic Fun, who have licensed the Lite-Brite brand from Hasbro and have run with it, sending us for review their first incarnation - The LITE-BRITE MAGIC SCREEN.