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It took all of about twelve hours to happen - the first round of Coleco Evolved Mini Arcades hit Kickstarter and became fully-funded. Back in 1981, Coleco first issued their classic tabletop arcade machines - versions of arcade favorites like Pac-Man and Donkey Kong, shrunk into miniature form by a suspicious character known as "Mr. Arcade" (that's how it happened in the commercials, anyway). These machines have become iconic, and now they're coming back in a new form, ditching the primitive calculator screen for a full-color LCD display that's powered by a powerful new gaming chipset. They've also chucked the C-batteries in exchange for a rechargeable lithium ion battery pack, and the joystick and buttons have been revamped as well. The first two games available will be Rainbow Brite: Journey to Rainbow Land and Robotech The Macross Saga.

It's cold here in Northern Illinois, and as a fresh couple inches of snow covers the ground today following a near-60° warm-up just days ago, cabin fever is setting in as I think about spending some time outdoors when spring rolls around. I'm a big fan of lighting (my wife can vouch for my years of trial-and-error), and lately my eyes have been on the "Neo-Vintage" LED movement - modern tech that looks like the Edison bulbs of old. As that corner of the industry continues to evolve, it's interesting to see just how close we've come to LED bulbs that have the appearance of their incandescent ancestors, but the path hasn't been without some hiccups. One such glitch is the flicker - a hyper-strobe effect that usually can't be seen with the naked eye. This is something the LEDs have been known for, and something that's bugged me for years - particularly with seasonal lighting. If you've ever shot video of certain LEDs (Christmas lights are a prime example), you've seen the dramatic effect. Now comes The Burton Bulb, and they're aiming to fix all of that with flickerless Neo-Vintage LED tech.

Published in Home and Garden

Season two of ABC's The Toy Box is currently underway, and when the second episode airs this Sunday (October 8, 2017) at 7/6c, there will be two products featured that have already crossed my path here at Rock Father HQ. Joining Noochie Golf (first seen in 2013) is MAD MOVES - a new dance game created by Ashley Mady - founder and president of brand licensing agency and think tank Brandberry, Inc. Ahead of its television debut on The Toy Box, the game is available to order through a just-launched Kickstarter Campaign. With a modest goal of just $15K, MAD MOVES should have little problem blasting through that and bringing their game to the masses. Check out the pitch below!

I tend to be notoriously hesitant when it comes to crowdfunding efforts*, but once in awhile something hits my radar that I'll share here on the site. Tertill: The Solar-Powered Weeding Robot for Home Gardens is just such a project, and it's one that sorta breaks two of my barriers - crowdfunding and home robotics. I have no interest in owning a Roomba to vacuum for me, and when it comes to lawn-mowing robots, that's just terrifying (they look like Battlebots, so I figure they'll attack children) and of no interest since I love mowing my lawn. One thing I don't like? Weeding our gardens. In our raised beds here at Rock Father HQ, we have a major weed problem, and the girls and I can't keep it under control. It's a huge pain, and that's where a little guy like Tertill can come in. Check this out, and watch the pitch video below.

Published in Home and Garden

Please note: Before submitting a crowdfunding project for coverage, read this.

Is it newsworthy that 5-Minute Dungeon has already raised over $155K against a $30K goal and still has 16 days left to fund? Perhaps, since a lot of people love card games, including many readers of this site. In recent days, I've had people continue to tell me about this game (peers and all), but it's just not my bag, despite the fact that the makers of the game are currently pitching 5-Minute Dungeon as a "Family Game Night" option. Take a look and see what you think...

There have been plenty of orchestral covers of popular music over the years, from those "String Tribute" albums to variations performed by various smaller configurations, sometimes focusing on specific instruments, like cello. Today comes something bigger - a full orchestra comprised of "some of L.A.'s finest session players," tackling some iconic songs by the likes of RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE, TOOL, SYSTEM OF A DOWN and more. Metamorphestra is a brand-new orchestra, founded in 2016 by conductor Nick Proch, and they hit my radar thanks to a performance of SOAD's "Chop Suey!" that took place at Capitol Studios. The clip comes as the orchestra seeks to crowdfund their debut album via Kickstarter. Check out the incredibly cinematic reimagining below...

Published in Music News
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