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Another week, another outrage. Parents love to get all bent out of shape about marketing these days, but sometimes the subject of the anger is just so ridiculous that any point in arguing becomes mute. Prime example: SKECHERS’ recent line of Daddy’s Money (styled as “Daddy’$ Money” with a Ke$ha-like “$”) shoes. Mom Bloggers, Dad Bloggers, “Journalists” and pretty much anyone with keyboard full of virtual ink seems to be taking shots at the Skechers campaign this week, with many wondering “What kind of message” is being taught to girls about these colorful kicks with a “hidden” high heel inside.

daddyzebraThe Reality: Daddy’$ Money look like knock-offs of the classic “Chuck Taylor” (Converse) canvas high-top design, hastily cobbled together by someone that watched a couple of LMFAO music videos and thought it was time to make a few shoes. If we were in the early 90s, the same individual would’ve likely swapped the “$” for a “Z” to ca$h in on the whole “urban” craze of the time by releasing “DaddyZ Money.” Either way, it’s just a laughably hokey idea, that almost certainly has no message intended whatsoever. Yes, Mommy’$ make money, too – but I doubt that Skechers was anticipating much response at all about this shoe line or campaign. To debate the socio-economic implications of Daddy’$ Money, I invite you to go elsewhere.

You know what’s truly offensive? This image from the Daddy’$ Money commercial and website:
daddyguitar
That young lady is clearly holding a right-handed guitar upside-down in a left-handed pose. If that’s not bad enough, look at her hands – it’s obvious that this girl has never held a guitar before, much less does she know how to play it. As The Rock Father, I find this truly outrageous – and not in a JEM! kinda way.

Despite the terrible imagery, I kid. The entire Daddy’$ Money project is a failure… unless it happens to make money for Skechers.  Regardless, Skechers has a “sketchy” history of late (those shady “Shape-Up” shoes that my wife spent over $100 on), and to think that I actually used to like their men’s shoes quite a bit.

Take a peek at the Daddy’$ Money commercial for yourself, and see if you agree with me that the “outrage” and widespread attempts and heavy analysis isn’t worth the time:
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 I just wasted five minutes writing this blog. Share your thoughts below…